Thursday, July 5, 2007

Gisela's Command Station is not occupied for a fews days...

will be back later....

Hydrangea arborescens Annabelle


Hydrangea arborescens Annabelle
blooms on new wood so you can prune heavily right into (early) spring
should you have been busy drinking hot rum on the bear skin rug all winter.
Grows to five to ten feet…plant four feet on center.
By the way, the characteristic of blooming on the current season’s growth is the primary reason
Annabelle Hydrangea can be recommended so casually to cold climate gardeners.
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Monday, July 2, 2007

new Clematis in my garden: Star of India

Star of India: Deep purple-blue with a crimson bar.
The flowers are mostly produced several metres above ground level and then hang down.
Its vigorous but sparse and open growth, sending up just a few stems, makes it one of the best for rambling through climbing roses,
spring flowering shrubs or for reaching into small or medium sized trees.
Highly recommended for growing through a Clematis montana and probably the best variety to grow through a wisteria.
Star of India flowers from mid-summer until late autumn.
It suits all aspects, including shade.
Prune Star of India to near ground level in winter: it will still make the necessary metres of growth once it is established.

Beschreibung : Jacjmanii Gruppe (etwas schneiden )

Farbe : lila-violett

Höhe : 3 m

Blütezeit: Juli - September

Winterhärte: Vollkommen winterhart

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What do you have for breakfast?? Was gibt es zum Frühstück??


Enjoying breakfast, lunch and dinner overlooking the garden.
We have some cereal or muesli, yogurt, banana, apple and milk for breakfast.
Well, we try to live healthy..how about you?
What do you have for breakfast?
Was gibt's zum Frühstück?

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Sunday, July 1, 2007

Max' siesta on Canada Day



A genetic study of the origins of the domestic cat, being published today in the journal Science, indicates that tabbies, Persians and Siamese cats wandered into Near Eastern settlements at the dawn of agriculture -- about 12,000 years ago, actually.


Read the Story: Why Do Cats Hang Around Us? (Hint: They Can't Open Cans) ( Post, June 29)

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